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...And in the darkness bind them... [Jun. 3rd, 2005|08:57 am]

huffines
X-posted in my personal journal

In fair Broken Bow where we set our scene - seven year old Josh having just been tucked into bed in the room shared with his brother. Their dad sits next to the boys' beds and opens a weathered and beaten old book and begins reading:

"When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his elventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton."

From the age of seven, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings has been a major part of my life's perspective. Tonight, I finished the extended version of Paytah Jiksen's* masterful adaptation of Return of the King. Has there ever been a more impressive display of genius in the modern age of The Cinema?

Two weeks ago I saw the third prequel of the Star Wars saga, and it pales in comparison to the power of the Rings movies. George Lucas should be ashamed with his insistance on producing films that are basically CGI movies with a couple of live actors thrown in for good measure. Shame on him for taking a great morality tale (the original trilogy) and basically turning it into Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, only without the humor. In terms of believability, a Pixar production looks more realistic than Mr. Lucas' prequel trilogy.

Am I being too hard on Mr. Lucas? Perhaps. But for all of the cinematic advancements for which he claims to have pushed, the results which he has devined from those advancements are embarrassing when contrasted directly with Mr. Jackson's Lord of the Rings. The CGI of the new Star Wars films is distracting from the tale. Therefore, as much as Mr. Lucas wants us to believe that all of the effects are neccessary for the story, they actually are detrimental to the story telling process.

Yes, I am well aware that Mr. Jackson's trilogy has more than its fair share of CGI. However, there is far more organic scenary and hand crafted sets throughout the Rings. The use of real New Zealand scenary, and the use of actual sets help to blend the epic CGI battle scenes. It makes a more believable film. Mr. Jackson's vision far surpasses the techie noodling of Mr. Lucas. And thus, Mr. Lucas' saga has become little more than popcorn entertainment whereas Mr. Jackson's films have become some of the finest in the entire Cinematic Canon.

Do people realize how lucky we are to have seen such a brilliant work of art, and not just in one film, but three?**



*This is my phonetic spelling of Kiwi pronunciation.

**One of my first movie memories was watcing The Return of the Jedi at a drive-in in Jacksonville, Illinois. Mr. Lucas does know how to tell a story well and with a proper balance of style and substance. The original (read: non-Special Edition) Star Wars trilogy is a case in point.
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Starwars Episode III [May. 20th, 2005|01:27 pm]

tyrven
Heather and I went and saw Starwars last night. I had heard from multiple people that it was better than Jedi. I disagree...Collapse )
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is anybody out there? hey you guuuuys..... [May. 11th, 2005|08:01 pm]

karinkarinkarin
hee.

yeah. that's pretty much it.
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Phantom of the Opera [Jan. 21st, 2005|01:16 am]

tyrven
I should first off note that I really cannot stand Andrew Loyyd Webber, nor have I since I saw Les Mis. That said, it is hardly a surprise that I really didn't enjoy the film adaptation of his musical (which he produced and wrote the screenplay for). That said, the first five minutes were quite lovely and well done.
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The Life Aquatic [Jan. 3rd, 2005|02:03 am]

tyrven
I really didn't enjoy The Life Aquatic, even despite a notable fondness for previous Wes Anderson movies (my favorite being Rushmore). I chuckled a couple of times and appreciated seeing Willem Defoe in a comedy but that aside I was completely bored. I've been looking forward to the film for some time and was disappointed that I just couldn't get into it.

Heather proposed leaving a quarter the way through, but I kept hoping it would pick up. And it did. But not enough to salvage my opinion of the movie.

Tomorrow we're going to watch Bottle Rockets again.
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Movie Reviews [Dec. 28th, 2004|01:54 pm]

tyrven
To pull an Andy (yeah, I've been in that anti-social netflix queuing routine).Apparently I don't like it when films tell me what to think.
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Alfie (2004) [Dec. 3rd, 2004|06:31 pm]

karinkarinkarin
Alfie (2004)
Directed by: Charles Shyer (known for Father of the Bride (I and II)

Jeremy, Heather and I decided to go watch Alfie yesterday night at Pacific Place, forfeiting the Art Walk in favor of an activity that didn't require wandering around Pioneer Square in the cold cold weather. And, while the main reason for going to the movie was to see Jude Law (so dreamy), I left a little disappointed with the film (although Jude didn't let me down).

jumbled random thoughts that you are definitely not required, or encouraged, to readCollapse )
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*qatsi [Nov. 25th, 2004|03:12 pm]

tyrven
So, I rented the *qatsi trilogy from Netflix.

I enjoyed the first one quite a bit, partly because it coincided with my mood but mostly because it had a notable transition and, I felt, a well articulated message that anyone could understand (independent of culture or language). While, despite the director's claims, I felt it had a clear subjective agenda, I also thought it was a worthwhile observation.

The second film seemed largely reactionary to the criticisms of the first one and catered to an optimistic celebration of life instead of the director's core challenge of technological advancement. I didn't find it engaging or impactful, outside a beautiful montage of collected pieces of film. The visuals were much better; many of the shots were amazing. Still, it seemed pointless outside of background decor.

I didn't even bother watching the third installment. I watched a three minute trailer and was disappointed by how excessively manipulated the images were. While I'm sure this was consistent with the message it seemed to undermine the simplistic beauty and overall thrust of the series. I would likely find it more accessible if I approached it as a stand-alone film.

Oh, and Philip Glass grates on my nerves.
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The Godfather [Nov. 25th, 2004|03:02 pm]

tyrven
Heather and I just watched The Godfather, which I hadn't seen in a while. I'm still trying to get my mind around Michael Corleone's character. I think it's his complexity that makes the films so compelling. Vito Corleone's character, by contrast, is a lot more consistent to a strictly established ideological discipline; in Al Pacino's role, though, there are a lot of competing variables which come into play.

In some ways, he seems far more objective and intellectual than his father. In other regards, he constantly disregards the idea that "it's only business" even despite his own attachment to that concept. Perhaps it's his pride.

What makes him tick? Is he driven by his selfish best interest? Or by carefully instrumented rationalizations of base emotional reactions?
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Review: "Team America:World Police" or, Freedom may cost a buck o' five but I had to pay $6.50 [Oct. 17th, 2004|04:02 pm]

huffines
[music |Elliott Smith - Figure 8 (album), Pearl Jam - Yield (album)]

Team America: World Police, Paramount Pictures, 2004
Directed by Trey Parker
Written by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, and Pam Brady
Rating: 4 out of 10

The four guys come across an old man on a telephone poll.

1st Guy: Hey old man, whatcha doin' up there?
Old Man: Uhh, I'm not sure
3rd Guy: Need any help getting down?
Old Man: Naah, I don't think so.
4th Guy: Stupid bastard.
3rd Guy: No worse than us. He's all action and no theory. We're all theory and no action.

(from Richard Linklater's Waking Life)

Merriam-Webster describes satire as 1 : a literary work holding up human vices and follies to ridicule or scorn and 2 : trenchant wit, irony, or sarcasm used to expose and discredit vice or folly. Taken as such, Team America: World Police, the latest barrage of irritated sophomoric wit and hostility from South Park masterminds Trey Parker and Matt Stone, succeeds on a very basic level.

However, the film does not deliver a focused message...Collapse )
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Garden State [Sep. 24th, 2004|01:54 pm]

tyrven
Garden State
Zach Braff, 2004
Rating: 7/10

karinkarinkarin and I saw Garden State yesterday. Overall, I really enjoyed it. The theme is cliche and the overall plot arc is predictable but that didn't make it any less entertaining; the movie is about the moment and the mood and in that respect it's very successful. The soundtrack is amazing and complements the visuals very effectively.

That said, it is not without cricism.Still, the acting, overall, was strong and I really thought it was a sweet movie. Oh, and Natalie Portman is a doll.
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Movie Recommendations [Sep. 13th, 2004|03:47 pm]

tyrven
+24Collapse )
Fa yeung nin wa (In the Mood for Love)
Wong Kar Wai
2000, Hong Kong
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the things you learn at work [Sep. 1st, 2004|02:22 pm]

karinkarinkarin
I never knew that arthur miller was once married to marilyn monroe. (link)

not that it's relevant or anything.

but still interesting, nonetheless.
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intolerable cruelty [Aug. 29th, 2004|12:00 am]

karinkarinkarin
just one thing:

las vegas wedding, scottish style.
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10 Films to look forward to in the rest of 2004. [Aug. 15th, 2004|04:08 am]

an_da_roo

10 Films to look forward to in the rest of 2004.

 

From my perspective, 2004, has been about eclecticism.  For some reason those big sure fire hits like Spider-Man 2, The Day After Tomorrow, Van Helsing, etc., despite their relative success, are not striking the chords they used to.  I mean yeah, Spider-Man has made a lot of money, but does anybody even care anymore? 

 

It’s ever becoming apparent that you can make a movie about the crucification of Christ and get an audience, you can make a documentary and get a $100 million + dollar audience, YOU CAN make a small female targeted action/comedy/drama and get an audience (Kill Bill 2/Mean Girls/The Notebook), YOU CAN EVEN write a sequel to a generic CG movie about a green ogre, get critical approval, and end up as one of the top money making movies of all time.  You can even get an NC-17 wide release in America now (The Dreamers).  Even the indie theaters’ box offices are on FIRE. 

 

With that said, big and small, there are a lot of interesting projects coming out.  We got a Scorsese epic coming, the hopeful “return” of Oliver Stone with Alexander, we got very smart, very adult dramas and thrillers by acclaimed directors upcoming… films like We Don’t Live Here Anymore, Birth, Proof and Closer.  We got the long awaited Phantom of the Opera.  The release schedule seems to be dotted with far, far more foreign films than usual.  Hero, Warriors of Heaven and Earth, Motorcycle Diaries, Bad Education, A Very Long Engagement, Zatoichi, etc.

 

Here is my short, short but hopefully eclectic look at 10 films that are on the way that I think look great:

 

Birth, The Incredibles, Kinsey, The Life Aquatic, Un long dimanche de fiancailles, The Motorcycle Diaries, Saw, Shaun of the Dead, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, Team America: World PoliceCollapse )

 

 

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(no subject) [Aug. 5th, 2004|02:04 pm]

karinkarinkarin
Ralph Fiennes!

mmm.
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Member: New/Theme: Cronenberg [Jul. 12th, 2004|12:15 am]

jessiesquash
Ahhh, here it is. My very first post in this community. I'm going to admit that I feel a bit out of water because I've always thought my taste in movies was rather odd. I usually avoided sharing a lot of my opinions but I've slowly come out of the movie review closet. So, that being said, enclosed is my very first review.

Totally unintentionally I made it a David Cronenberg weekend. Until yesterday I was a Cronenberg virgin. </a></b></a>tyrven recommended Spider to me and as I'm always looking for new movies, I jumped up and rented it. Crash I found while aimlessly wandering among the video racks at Blockbuster. James Spader's name caught my eye, as usual. He's my new favorite actor. I love how he seems to relish getting down and very dirty in his roles, yet always manages to retain his slightly aloof boy next door persona.

Movie: Crash
Director: David Cronenberg
Rating: 5/10
Crash didn't leave me with...Collapse )

Movie: Spider
Director: David Cronenberg
Rating: 9/10
It's very hard to contemplate....Collapse )
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random thought that I thought somewhat appropriate to post here: [Jul. 2nd, 2004|11:30 pm]

karinkarinkarin
michael keaton deserves something special.

I mean, who else can pull of both betelgeuse from beetlejuice AND bruce wayne from batman?

not to mention dogberry from much ado about nothing.


however, that's not to say that I'm not looking forward to christian bale.
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06.2004 Non reviews. [Jul. 1st, 2004|10:05 pm]

an_da_roo
ROUND ‘EM UP! 27 films I hadn’t seen during the 30 days of June 2004…

  1. Daddy Day CareCollapse )

  2. Ghost WorldCollapse )

  3. HeavenCollapse )

  4. Heaven Can WaitCollapse )

  5. Bad SantaCollapse )

  6. Bad CompanyCollapse )

  7. Secret WindowCollapse )

  8. The Lost Skeleton of CadavraCollapse )

  9. RougeCollapse )

  10. SpartanCollapse )

  11. SlasherCollapse )

  12. TorqueCollapse )

  13. Full Metal JacketCollapse )

  14. A Decade Under the InfluenceCollapse )

  15. Touching the VoidCollapse )

  16. The Station AgentCollapse )

  17. MonsterCollapse )

  18. StripesCollapse )

  19. Alien: ResurrectionCollapse )

  20. Dumb and Dumberer: Where Harry Met LloydCollapse )

  21. Along Came PollyCollapse )

  22. Cidade de DeusCollapse )

  23. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking BarrelsCollapse )

  24. Lost in La ManchaCollapse )

  25. BlancCollapse )

  26. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of AzkabanCollapse )

  27. QuillsCollapse )

Feel free to expand at will...
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F/911 [Jun. 28th, 2004|03:32 am]

tyrven
Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004)
Director: Michael Moore
Rating: 7/10

Abstract: It's a Michael Moor film.

Plot Summary: Bush is bad (yeah, we know... we didn't vote for him).

Details: You probably know all of the facts that he's presenting; it's an impactful compilation but not any more informative than hanging out at a party in Seattle for more than twenty minutes. Contains typical Michael Moore nonsense such as hijacking an ice cream truck and reading The Patriot Act outside of congress on a loud speaker; you know a director is objective when he puts himself (and his enormous ego) front and center.

Conclusion: If you had any doubts about who the audience was then it should be clear at the end when the choir is raised to their feet in unison with a cheer of halleluiah.

Personal Bias: While true objectivity is asymptotic that doesn't mean that we need to take impurity to an offensively subjective and manipulative extreme. Any good liberal will knock Rush Limbaugh for his ridiculously extreme bias and slanting of facts; every good conservative will do the same to Michael Moore. His humor, while making for an entertaining movie, fails to sugar coat his bias enough to make it easier to swallow even by those with a reasonably open mind; in as such, it ultimately fails to provide anything relevant or convincing to hordes that voted for Bush the first time. While I'm consistently amused with his films I feel that they make light of serious issues by turning them into circus debacles without any strong basis in comprehensive assessment or rational consideration.

Yes, you're clever, Michael, we get it.
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Starwars Episode II [Jun. 26th, 2004|01:39 am]

tyrven
My roommate and I watched the Starwars trilogy recently. I've often distanced myself from any interest in the films out of distaste for how overhyped they are. That aside, however, they are definitely entertaining and relatively well told stories. I think they are enjoyable and technically admirable.

We then went and watched Episode II. I cannot even begin to express how much complete shit that movie is. It's unbelievable to me that the same mind that created THX 1138 would, after almost thirty years, turn out complete garbage like Attack of the Clones.

The dialog, even by Starwars standards, is painful. Everytime Anakin, Jar Jar or C3P0 open their mouths I just want to put a hole in my head. The special effects don't integrate at all; on second viewing, everyone looks like they're against a blue screen (funny that) and almost all of the CGI is overstated. It still blows my mind that ILM is considered the premier digital effects company in Hollywood. Almost everything they do looks rendered. One of the few movies they've impressed me on recently was Pirates of the Carribean.

Oh, and when Anakin is wooing Natalie Portman's character... fuck, I literally want to vomit. There is no way people should be permitted to get laid after using lines like that. I know it's a galaxy far, far away but that doesn't mean they need to foresake all tastefulness. Arrrg.
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Mild spoiler alters... Saved! [Jun. 21st, 2004|10:37 pm]

huffines
Saved!
Directed by: Brian Dannelly (co-writer)
Rating: 6/10 Stars

This film begins promisingly enough. Mary (Jena Malone), a teenage girl in an all Christian high school is convinced that Jesus Christ wants her to save her boyfriend Dean (Chad Faust - ironic last name, eh?) after he reveals to her that he is gay. Mary, an all around good Christian girl, decides that the best way to "cure" Dean is to have sex with him...and being that she is from quite a fundamentalist school, she gets pregnant because the sex was unprotected. You see, the sex-ed class came a bit too late.

I grew up in Oklahoma around the mentality that Brian Dannelly tries to comment on and I must say, it was interesting to see so many people that I went to high school with on screen. At times during this film, I became very uncomfortable. Some people may see characters such as Hilary Faye (Mandy Moore) as an unreasonable characiture, but I can attest to the accuracy of director Dannelly's observations.

There were a few genuinely funny moments in this film - not to mention a great performance by Eva Amurri (Susan Sarandon's daughter) as Cassandra, the outcast and sole Jewish student in the all Christian school. She stole the show with her "speaking in tongues" scene. Her comedic timing was spot on, and she gave her hard-shelled character a touch of softness around the edges when she forms an inner-circle with Roland (Macaulay Culkin) and Mary.

However, in that characterization lies the fatal flaw of this film. It relies so heavily on cliched formula that any of the observations of fundamentalist behavior, especially in a clicque-ish high school, are dulled. The story pivots on Mary hiding her pregnancy, only to have it discovered after being framed for vandalism by Hilary Faye. The climax of the film, and the resolution of some loose ends happens conveniently enough at the prom...at which, Hilary Faye is discovered to have been the student behind the vandalism. A horrible crime, too, because she had only moments before swore to God that she didn't do it.

There are more elements of teen-movie formula in the relationship between Mary and her mother (played by a perfectly cast Mary-Louise Parker) and with her romantic love interest, Patrick (Patrick Fugit of Almost Famous fame...pun intended). It is the formula that really bothers me about this film. It's recipe is too sweet for my tastes...and to sweet for the satirical ambitions that Dannelly so clearly had with his script.

That said, I do recommend at least renting the film when it is released to video specifically for two things:

1.) The Valarie Bertonelli Lifetime movie within the movie.

and

2.) Pastor Skip (Martin Donovan), Patrick's father and quite possibly the best satirical character in the film. Pastor Skip is the principal of the high school, a middle-aged man speaking to his students in teen-slang ("Who's down with tha G-O-D?"). While this character may seem a bit farcical at times, I can attest to just how close to the mark he is, having grown up in Oklahoma and attending church events with girlfriends-at-the-time.

Overall feeling about the film - it is mediocre, but more on the positive side, due to some inspired humor worked into the script. If you see it, see it at the matinee - or better yet, see it as your free-bee if you are like me and enjoy a good theater hopping experience.
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Review: The Whole Ten Yards [Jun. 17th, 2004|08:26 pm]

karinkarinkarin
Title: The Whole Ten Yards
Directed by: Howard Deutch
Rating: 4/10

So. In the grand tradition of sequels not being as good as the original, this one doesn't break the mold. While there were some funny parts to it (mostly Matthew Perry falling down, saying dumb things, and generally looking bewildered), they were few and far between.

Read more...Collapse )
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Last Weekend's offerings: [Jun. 7th, 2004|01:02 am]

an_da_roo
Something old, something new, something Potter, something... blanc.

Read more...Collapse )
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Monster [Jun. 4th, 2004|06:37 pm]

tyrven
I finally watched Monster. I'm too lazy to look up the IMDB information but y'all know what I'm talking about. The movie is well done; I think it articulates the circumstances relatively objectively without really forcing sides. Ultimately, because of this objectivity I didn't feel an emotional connection with a topic which I would have expected more from. Nonetheless, the acting was really quite superb and believable.

Most of the talk I heard about this movie centered around some hot lesbian sex scene. I'm not sure what that's all about. Neither of the characters are hot (they even manage to make Christina look homely) and the circumstances of their romance are so desparate that it's hard to feel anything but discust during any of the more intimate scenes.

Anyway, the movie has memorable scenes although I didn't find it particularly entertaining. By and large it really just paints a really negative view of humanity which, even despite my pessimistic views, was difficult to sympathize with.
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Robot Stories at Varsity FYI [Jun. 4th, 2004|09:53 am]

rpantso
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: ACCLAIMED INDEPENDENT FILM "ROBOT STORIES" RETURNS TO SEATTLE WITH FILMMAKER GREG PAK IN ATTENDANCE

SEATTLE, WA -- ROBOT STORIES, the closing night feature from last year's Northwest Asian American Film Festival, is coming back to Seattle for a theatrical run at the Varsity Theatre in Seattle's University District from June 11 to June 17.
Writer/director GREG PAK will be in Seattle to introduce the evening shows on Friday June 11th and all the shows on Saturday June 12th. Support Asian American cinema by coming to see Greg's film, and get a chance to chat with the director himself!

Critics speak out about ROBOT STORIES:
> "Fairly close to perfect." -- Peter Hartlaub, San Francisco Chronicle
> "Impeccably staged and acted." -- Frank Scheck, Hollywood Reporter
> "A quietly impassioned, genuinely stirring indie rarity." -- Mark Holcomb, Village Voice
> "One of the most moving pieces I've seen all year." -- John Petrakis, Chicago Tribune

For more information about ROBOT STORIES, visit www.robotstories.net. For show times, visit www.landmarktheatres.com or call (206) 781-5755.

*** RECEPTION FOR FILMMAKER GREG PAK ON JUNE 12 ***

After the screenings on June 12, Northwest Asian American Film Festival and the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame invite you to a reception with guest of honor Greg Pak at the stylish District Lounge in the University Tower Hotel. Bring your ROBOT STORIES ticket stub to the reception for a complimentary beverage!

Reception details are as follows:
> Date and time: Saturday, June 12, 9pm to 1am
> Location: The District Lounge in the Best Western University Tower Hotel, 4507 Brooklyn Ave. NE, Seattle
> Admission is free. Reception guests must be 21 or over.

For more information, email pr@nwaaff.org.

SAVE THE DATE:
> June 26, 2004 - Northwest Asian American Film Festival and the Unity of Vietnamese Americans Committee present a screening of the documentary SAIGON, USA.
> September 30 - October 3, 2004 - Northwest Asian American Film Festival 2004.

NORTHWEST ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL is a production of Northwest Asian American Theatre, this region‚s premier center for the presentation and development of theatrical, dance, and video works by Asian and Asian Pacific Island (API) American artists since 1973. The film festival has two missions: to showcase film and video works by Asian American artists living and working in the Pacific Northwest and to bring Asian American works from across North America to Seattle audiences. For more information about the festival, please visit the festival website at http://www.nwaaff.org.

THE SCIENCE FICTION MUSEUM AND HALL OF FAME is the world‚s first museum devoted to the genre of science fiction. Co-located with Experience Music Project in the landmark Frank Gehry building at the Base of the Space Needle, the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame combines artifacts and information in evocative environments that immerse visitors in science fiction's "alternative worlds." The Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame opens on June 18, 2004. For more information, please visit the official site at http://www.sfhomeworld.org.

=== END ===
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(no subject) [May. 22nd, 2004|02:02 pm]

huffines

Well, you know what this means, don't you? Mickey Mouse definately wasn't on the panel of judges this year.

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18 Movies in 10 Days, or How I Spend My Lonesome Days and Nights in Poverty [May. 9th, 2004|09:27 pm]

an_da_roo
Ready?

Set?

Go!

Read more...Collapse )
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Bom yeoreum gaeul gyeoul geurigo bom [May. 9th, 2004|01:37 am]

tyrven
Bom yeoreum gaeul gyeoul geurigo bom (2003)
Directed By: Ki-Duk Kim
Rating: 7/10

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring is a coming of age story about a Buddhist monk. It's a very beautiful movie with a pleasant pacing and gorgeous scenery. Also, it contains a number of unexpected events which caught me off guard and set the movie apart from other movies in the genre.

The music in the movie added little; it didn't detract from it, per se, but I feel that it would have been stronger without it as many of the scenes were quite powerful on their own.

From what I know of Buddhism, the film seems to effectively represent the values and beliefs of the religion.

I think this movie is worth watching for the scenery alone, although of related films I felt that Kundun was much more moving.
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Discuss [May. 8th, 2004|09:56 pm]

huffines
Ah, Triplets of Belleville, how I love the!
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